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Organization, Regulations, and Courses 2017-18


Economics

Chair: Christopher M. Snyder

Vice Chair: James D. Feyrer

Professors D. T. Allen, P. M. Anderson, D. G. Blanchflower, D. Comin, E. V. Edmonds, W. A. Fischel, A. L. Gustman, D. A. Irwin, M. G. Kohn, A. T. Levin, E. F. P. Luttmer, N. P. Marion, N. Pavcnik, B. I. Sacerdote, A. A. Samwick, J. T. Scott, J. S. Skinner, C. M. Snyder, D. O. Staiger, R. W. Staiger, S. F. Venti, J. Zinman, E. W. Zitzewitz; Associate Professors E. U. Cascio; T. L. Dinkelman, J. D. Feyrer, R. C. Johnson, E. G. Lewis; Assistant Professors L. Agha,  P. Novosad, S. G. Schaner, N. Shenhav, T. C. Youle; Visiting Professors L. L. Kreicher, C. F. Zarnowski; Visiting Associate Professor D. Vollrath; Senior Lecturers E. S. Curtis, M. P. Doyle, M. B. Rose; Adjunct Associate Professor E. R. Meara

 

To view Economics courses, click here.

 

Requirements for the Major

Prerequisites: ECON 1 and ECON 10, with an average grade no lower than C, and MATH 3. A student who fails to achieve the minimum grade average for the prerequisites may, with the permission of the vice chair, substitute grades in ECON 21 and ECON 20 for those in ECON 1 and ECON 10, respectively. Another statistics course may be substituted for ECON 10 with permission of the vice chair.  Newly declared Econ Majors who have not previously satisfied this requirement must take Econ 10.

Requirements : Nine courses in addition to the prerequisites, with a GPA for these nine courses of no less than 2.0. The nine courses must include the following:

  1. ECON 20, ECON 21, and ECON 22
  2. Any two of the following sequences.  No course may be used in more than one sequence (depending on the sequences chosen, one or two additional courses may be needed): 24-39, 24-27, 24-71, 25-35, 26-36, 26-76, 27-71, 28-38, 28-71, 29-39, 32-29, 32-76, 32-78, 24-44, 25-45, 26-36-46, 27-47, 28-48, 29-39-49, 80-81, 81-82, 80-82.  At least one of the sequences must include a 40 level course, or 80, or 82.  This requirement will serve as the culminating experience in the major.  Econ 20, 21 and 22 must be completed prior to the culminating experience.

Notes: ECON 2 and ECON 5 may not be counted toward fulfillment of the major requirement.

Requirements for the Modified Major

The modified major is intended to fit the needs of students who have a definite interest in economics but are interested also in studying some specific problem or topic that falls partly in the field of economics, the study of which depends also upon courses in related fields, e.g., mathematics or other social sciences. Each student’s program must be approved by the vice chair of the department no later than fall of senior year; this approved program of courses constitutes the major.

Prerequisites : ECON 1 and ECON 10, with an average grade no lower than C, and MATH 3. A student who fails to achieve the minimum grade average for the prerequisites may, with permission of the vice chair, substitute grades in ECON 21 and ECON 20 for those in ECON 1 and ECON 10, respectively. Another statistics course may, in certain instances, be substituted for ECON 10 with permission of the vice chair.  Newly declared Econ modified majors who have not previously satisfied this requirement must take Econ 10.

Requirements:

  1. A unified, coherent program of at least ten courses is required, of which at least six courses must be in economics (in addition to ECON 1, ECON 10 and MATH 3) and four courses in a field or fields related to the special topic approved by the department vice chair. The GPA for the six courses in Economics must be no less than 2.0. The additional courses in a field outside of economics must be chosen from those satisfying the major of the department offering the course.
  2. The six courses in economics shall include:
    1. ECON 20, ECON 21, and ECON 22.
    2. Any one of the following sequences(depending on the sequence chosen, one additional course may be needed): 24-44, 25-45, 26-36-46, 27-47, 28-48, 29-39-49, 80-81, 81-82, 80-82. Econ 20, 21 and 22 must be completed prior to the culminating experience.

Requirements for Another Major Modified with Economics

Prerequisites : ECON 1 and ECON 10, with an average grade no lower than C, and MATH 3. (A student who fails to achieve the minimum grade average for the prerequisites may, with the permission of the vice chair, substitute grades in ECON 21 and ECON 20 for those in ECON 1 and ECON 10, respectively. Another statistics course may, in certain instances, be substituted for ECON 10 with permission of the vice chair.)

Requirements : A unified, coherent program of at least four courses in economics in addition to the prerequisites, with a GPA of no less than 2.0. The four courses must either: contain both ECON 21 and ECON 22, or contain a sequence of at least 2 courses and one of either ECON 21 or ECON 22. Thus, there are three ways to complete the modification with economics:

  1. ECON 21 and ECON 22, plus any two other Economics courses.
  2. ECON 21 or Econ 22, plus any of the following sequences: 24-39, 24-27, 24-71, 25-35, 26-36, 26-76, 27-71, 28-38, 28-71, 29-39, 32-29, 32-76, 32-78 plus any other major course.  With the permission of the vice chair, a student may substitute other courses to fulfill these requirements.

Economics Minor

Prerequisites : ECON 1 and ECON 10, with an average grade no lower than C, and MATH 3. A student who fails to achieve the minimum grade average for the prerequisites may, with the permission of the vice chair, substitute grades in ECON 21 and ECON 20 for those in ECON 1 and ECON 10, respectively. Another statistics course may be substituted for ECON 10 with permission of the vice chair.  Newly declared Econ minors who have not previously satisfied this requirement must take Econ 10.

Requirements : Six courses in addition to the prerequisites, with a GPA for these six courses of no less than 2.0. No courses can be counted toward both a major and a minor. The six courses must include the following:

  1. ECON 20, ECON 21, and ECON 22
  2. Any one of the following sequences (depending on the sequence chosen, one additional course may be needed): 24-44, 25-45, 26-36-46, 27-47,28-48, 29-39-49, 80-81, 81-82, 80-82.  Econ 20, 21 and 22 must be completed prior to the culminating experience.

No courses can be counted toward both a major and a minor. With the permission of the vice chair, a student may substitute other courses to fulfill these requirements.

Transfer Credit

Normally, no more than three courses transferred for Dartmouth credit from other institutions will be credited toward fulfillment of a regular or modified major in economics, including both prerequisites and courses counting for the major. No transfer credit is possible for a 40-level or an 80-level course to satisfy the culminating experience.

Economics Honors Program

The Honors Program in Economics provides qualified students with the opportunity of doing research in economics, either initiated during their 40 or 80 level course or in ECON 85, and then writing an Honors thesis (ECON 87) in the senior year.

To be eligible for the Program, a student must have a grade point average of at least 3.3 in courses counting toward the major (excluding ECON 1, ECON 10, and MATH 3), and an overall grade point average of at least 3.0 for courses taken through the term immediately preceding enrollment in ECON 85 or, in the case where the research is begun in the 40-level course, preceding enrollment in ECON 87. In order to be eligible for honors, one additional Economics course beyond those needed for the major is required.

Prior to enrolling in ECON 85 or ECON 87, the student must have the written approval of the vice chair and a faculty member in the economics department who is willing to act as an adviser. The adviser may be the teacher of the 40-level course and would usually be a professor whose own research interests lie in the area in which the student wants to work.  Students whose major paper in their 40 or 80 level course are considered worthy of developing into a thesis and who meet all other requirements will be invited to enroll in ECON 87.

Majors enrolled in a 40-level course or in ECON 80, ECON 81, or ECON 82 (“80-level”) whose research papers for the course are deemed of exceptional merit by the instructor shall be granted honors in economics without necessarily enrolling in ECON 87. No more than two students per section may be granted honors in this way without a vote of the department. Students who achieve honors by this method must still complete ten major courses (beyond prerequisites) to receive honors. Students may subsequently enroll in ECON 87 and extend their research from the 40 or 80 level course in order to be eligible for high honors. Failure to enroll in or to complete ECON 87 will not forfeit the original honors designation unless the course is necessary to obtain a count of ten major courses.

An additional method of earning honors is to complete the ECON 80-81-82 sequence with an average of B+, with a total of at least ten courses in the major, and having received a grade of A- or better in each of the prerequisite classes (i.e. ECON 20, ECON 21 and ECON 22 with no recorded W from any of these classes). The instructors of this sequence may recommend that students who have done outstanding work in these courses be granted, by a vote of the department, high honors.

Both regular majors and modified majors who wish to undertake the Honors Program will normally be expected to have taken all the courses relevant to their topic prior to enrollment in ECON 85, or ECON 87 if the student writes the Honors thesis directly after the 40-level course. An average grade of B+ (3.33) or better in ECON 85 and ECON 87, or a 40-level course and 87 for the alternative approach to developing the Honors thesis, will entitle the student to graduate with ‘Honors in Economics.’ A vote of the Department is necessary to achieve ‘High Honors in Economics.’ The Department will take into account the student’s performance on the thesis and his or her record in Economics courses in awarding ‘High Honors.’