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Organization, Regulations, and Courses 2017-18


Physics and Astronomy - Graduate

Chair: John R. Thorstensen

Professors M. P. Blencowe, R. R. Caldwell, B. C. Chaboyer, R. A. Fesen, M. Gleiser, M. K. Hudson, J. W. LaBelle, K. A. Lynch, R. M. Millan, R. Onofrio, A. J. Rimberg, B. N. Rogers, R. Sarpeshkar, J. R. Thorstensen, L. Viola, M. N. Wybourne; Associate Professors R. C. Hickox, C. Ramanathan; Assistant Professors Y-H Liu,  D. G. E. Walker, J. D. Whitfield, K. C. Wright; Visiting Professor Y. J. Brown; Adjunct Professors P. Crane, W. Lotko, B. W. Pogue, J. B. Weaver; Adjunct Associate Professors A. H. Barnett, B. T. Kress, C. G. Levey, T. P. Smith, A. Ukhorskiy; Adjunct Assistant Professor F. Ticozzi; Research Professors R. E. Denton, J. G. Lyon, H-R Mueller.

 

To view Astronomy Graduate courses, click here.

To view Physics Graduate courses, click here.

To view Physics and Astronomy Undergraduate requirements, click here.

To view Astronomy Undergraduate courses, click here.

To view Physics Undergraduate courses, click here.

 

Courses for Graduate Credit

Physics and astronomy courses offered for graduate credit are those numbered 061 or higher. The Department of Physics and Astronomy will allow graduate credit for any course offered by the Departments of Biochemistry, Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Engineering Sciences, or Mathematics that receives graduate credit from that department.

Requirements for the Master’s Degree (M.S.)

The general requirements for the master’s degree are given in the Graduate Study section of this catalog. These requirements, together with the specific requirements of the Department of Physics and Astronomy indicated below, normally allow completion of the degree in two years. It is expected that graduate students who have not completed the equivalent of the Dartmouth physics major program will do so in their first year of graduate study.

 

Physics students:

  1. Degree credit for eight graduate courses, exclusive of teaching courses. Two of the eight courses may be Graduate Research. At least six of the eight courses should be in physics and astronomy.
  2. Credit for at least one term of Supervised Undergraduate Teaching (PHYS 257).
  3. Completion of a culminating experience chosen from the following options:
    1. Completion of a satisfactory thesis, which must be defended before the M.S. Thesis Committee in a public forum.
    2. Significant co-authorship of a publication submitted to a refereed journal or refereed conference proceedings, defended publicly.
    3. Passing the Ph.D. qualifying examination.

Astronomy students:

  1. Degree credit for eight graduate courses, exclusive of teaching courses. Two of the eight courses may be Graduate Research. At least six of the eight courses should be in physics and astronomy.
  2. Credit for at least one term of Supervised Undergraduate Teaching (PHYS 257).
  3. Completion of a culminating experience chosen from the following options:
    1. Completion of a satisfactory thesis, which must be defended before the M.S. Thesis Committee in a public forum.
    2. Significant co-authorship of a publication submitted to a refereed journal or refereed conference proceedings, defended publicly.

Requirements for the Doctor’s Degree (Ph.D.)

A student will be admitted to Ph.D. candidacy upon:

 

Physics students:

  1. Receiving credit for six out of the following nine core courses: PHYS 76, PHYS 90 [formerly 91], PHYS 100, PHYS 101, PHYS 103-106, PHYS 109.
  2. Passing the departmental qualifying examination.
  3. Presenting a thesis proposal and successfully defending it before an appointed Ph.D. thesis committee, for certification.
  4. Passing a departmental review of the student’s course record and preliminary research progress.
  5. Receiving credit for at least two terms of Supervised Undergraduate Teaching (PHYS 257) and PHYS 256.   

Students must achieve thesis proposal certification by the end of the fall term of their fourth year, in order to remain in good standing. Students who successfully complete these requirements will be admitted to Ph.D. candidacy by the Department.

 

Astronomy students:

  1. Receiving credit for ASTR 74ASTR 115, ASTR 116, ASTR 117, ASTR 118 and any one physics course numbered 61 or above, and any other courses required by the student's advisory committee.  Receiving credit for at least six terms of graduate research.
  2. Passing a research exam at the end of their first and second years.
  3. Presenting a thesis proposal and successfully defending it before an appointed Ph.D. thesis committee, for certification.
  4. Passing a departmental review of the student’s course record and preliminary research progress.
  5. Receiving credit for at least two terms of Supervised Undergraduate Teaching (PHYS 257) and PHYS 256.

Students must achieve thesis proposal certification by the end of the fall term of their fourth year, in order to remain in good standing. Students who successfully complete these requirements will be admitted to Ph.D. candidacy by the Department.

 

The candidate will receive the Ph.D. degree upon

  1. Receiving degree credit for at least twelve graduate courses, exclusive of teaching courses. Physics students: Two of the twelve courses may be Graduate Research, and at least two terms of Graduate Research must be completed no later than the second summer in residence. Astronomy students: Six of the twelve courses may be Graduate Research, and at least six terms of Graduate Research must be completed no later than the second summer in residence.
  2. Receiving credit for at least two terms of Supervised Undergraduate Teaching (PHYS 257) and PHYS 256.
  3. Completing a dissertation of substantial significance and publishable quality.
  4. Successfully defending the dissertation before the Ph.D. Thesis Committee in a public forum.

It is expected that most students will receive the Ph.D. degree by the end of the fifth year of graduate study.