Office of the Registrar
Campus Address
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03755-3529
Phone: (603) 646-xxxx
Fax: (603) 646-xxxx
Email: reg@Dartmouth.EDU

Organization, Regulations, and Courses 2016-17


Engineering Sciences - Graduate

Chair: Erland M. Schulson

Professors I. Baker, B. Cushman-Roisin, G. Cybenko, E. Fossum, E. Garmire, T. U. Gerngross, J. J. Helble, W. Lotko, D. R. Lynch, L. R. Lynd, G.P. Parker, K. D. Paulsen, B. W. Pogue, L. R. Ray, E. Santos Jr., R. Sarpeshkar, E. M. Schulson, C. R. Sullivan, S. Taylor, J. Zhang; Professors Emeriti A. O. Converse, R. J. Graves, C. E. Hutchinson, F. E. Kennedy, H. J. Richter, B. U. O. Sonnerup, G. B. Wallis; Associate Professors M. E. Borsuk, S. G. Diamond, A.M. Farid, H. J. Frost, K. E. Griswold, E. W. Hansen, J.E. Hill, J. Liu, K. Odame, M. Q. Phan,  B. S. Trembly, U.G.K. Wegst; Assistant Professors M. E. Ackerman, Z. Chen, B.P. Epps, R. J. Halter, W. Li,  G.P. Luke, J.T. Stauth, D.W. Van Citters, V. Vaze; Senior Lecturers M. R. Albert, P. Bonfert-Taylor, J. P. Collier, A. Hartov, P. J. Hoopes, M. S. Laser, R. C. Lasky, C. G. Levey, V. V. May, R.W. Obbard, S. O. Peterson, V. F. Petrenko, P. J. Robbie, J. M. Rosen, S. G. Shepherd; Lecturers , D. C. Cullen, J. Elliott, K. Hoyt, A. Scherer, M.E. Testorf, R. McGranaghan, J.D. Wilson.

 

To view Engineering Sciences Graduate courses, click here.

To view Engineering Graduate courses, click here.

 

To view Engineering Sciences Undergraduate requirements, click here.

 

To view Engineering Sciences Undergraduate courses, click here. 

 

The undergraduate Engineering Sciences major leads to an A.B. degree. It provides engineering students with a common core of Science and Engineering Sciences courses. Interest in the various branches of engineering is accommodated through electives and usually through additional study leading to a Bachelor of Engineering or higher degree. For those students considering careers in such diverse fields as medicine, management, or law, the Engineering Sciences major enables them to better understand our increasingly technological society.

Students interested in a career in Engineering should plan on completing the Bachelor of Engineering or Master’s program. The Bachelor of Engineering degree program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 - telephone (410) 347-7700; it is equivalent in technical content to the Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering offered at many other universities but is broader in scope. It requires 10 courses in Natural Science, Mathematics, and Engineering beyond the requirements of the major in Engineering Sciences, and typically requires up to three terms in residence beyond the 12 terms required for the A.B. degree. Students who enter Dartmouth with advanced standing may be able to complete the B.E. at the same time as the A.B. (i.e., in four years).

The graduate degrees are differentiated according to function. For those interested in design, professional practice, and engineering management, the M.E.M. degree is offered; for those interested primarily in research, the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. Additionally a joint M.D./Ph.D. program is offered in conjunction with the Dartmouth Medical School and a joint M.E.M./M.B.A. program with the Tuck School of Business. The Thayer School Guide to Programs and Courses should be consulted for detailed information on all graduate   programs (B.E. and above).


Requirements for the Master’s Degree (M.S.)

 

The Faculty of the Thayer School believes that the education of all graduate students should include reasonable breadth in the areas of applied mathematics and engineering.

In addition to the basic requirements for the Master’s degree, which include three terms in residence at Dartmouth, the Department requires:

For the M.S. with concentration in Engineering Sciences:

  1. The requirement is nine approved graduate-level courses, five of which must be engineering courses. For students whose prior preparation is an accredited B.S. or B.E. in Engineering, or equivalent, the requirement is six graduate-level courses beyond those required for the B.S.
  2. Satisfaction of the following distribution requirements:
    1. One Applied Mathematics Course11
    2. Minimum of two courses in engineering breadth
    3. Minimum of three courses in engineering depth.
      (Courses taken previously, e.g., as an undergraduate, can be used in satisfaction of this requirement but do not reduce the number of courses required, unless admission is with advanced standing.)
  3. A thesis approved by the student’s graduate committee and the faculty, demonstrating the ability to do research and contribute to the field.
  4. An oral defense of the thesis.

11ENGS 91, ENGS 92, ENGS 93, ENGS 100, ENGS 104, ENGS 105, ENGS 106, ENGS 200, ENGS 202, ENGS 205

A faculty advisor will be appointed for each candidate to aid in developing his or her program. The individual course of study must be submitted to, and be approved by, the Thayer School Graduate Committee, during the student’s first term of residency. The thesis must be approved by a thesis committee. The thesis committee generally consists of three faculty members from the student’s department/program of study (including the thesis advisor). One of the three may be from outside the department/program, but this is not a requirement. Copyright to theses will be held by the Trustees of Dartmouth College.

For students recommended for the award of the M.S. degree, the faculty may also recommend the award of the B.E. degree if a substantial portion of the student’s undergraduate program was taken at Dartmouth or in one of its official exchange programs and, if in meeting M.S. requirements, the ABET criteria for the award of the B.E. are also satisfied. Students wishing to take advantage of this opportunity should plan their M.S. programs appropriately. At least one term prior to the scheduled M.S. thesis defense, the B.E./M.S. candidate submits a Bachelor of Engineering program plan approved by both their advisor and the Director of the Bachelor of Engineering program to the Registrar.

M.S.-M.D. Program

 

The M.S./M.D. program is offered by the Thayer School of Engineering and Dartmouth Medical School and is designed for individuals intending to pursue clinical practice but with an interest in developing research skills in a related engineering area. It is also well suited for individuals interested in developing better understanding of imaging and other technologies they will employ as practicing physicians. The program provides M.D. students with a funded research experience in engineering that is expected to lead to research publication as well as provide practical engineering design and analysis experience.

Individuals holding an undergraduate degree in engineering and meeting the entrance requirements of each school are eligible to apply. Application must be made to each school separately.

Candidates are M.D. students who apply to the Thayer School for admission in their first, second or third year of medical school. Studies for the Thayer M.S. will be carried out in the fourth and part of the fifth year.

For specific program requirements, please consult the Thayer Guide to Programs and Courses or the Thayer website at: http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/.

 

Requirements for the Doctor’s Degree (Ph.D.)

 

Students with a master’s degree (or outstanding performance on a bachelor’s degree) in engineering or the physical sciences are eligible for admission to the Doctor of Philosophy program. Consult the 2016-2017 Thayer School Guide to Programs and Courses for details. The requirements for the Ph.D. are as follows:

  1. Students in the Ph.D. program are expected to spend at least nine terms in residence following the Bachelor’s degree, three of which will take place after successfully completing the Oral Qualifying Examination. In addition, students are required to have:
    1. three terms (with three absences allowed) of participation in the weekly Thayer Seminar on Applied Science and Technology, including one-time completion of the special graduate Seminar on Science, Technology and Society, ENGG 195, with students required to attend only five of the nine meetings in a the term, and
    2. annual participation in the Research-in-Progress Workshop, for which each Candidate in residence presents his or her individual research progress.
  2. Technical proficiency in principles and methods of engineering, applied science, and applied mathematics underlying the anticipated thesis research, as evidenced by performance on an oral qualifying examination. The examination covers at least three fundamental areas selected by the Candidate in consultation with his or her special advisory committee and approved by the Graduate Program Committee. (See footnote below.)
  3. Technical breadth in engineering or applied science, as demonstrated by either an approved course of study in one or more areas outside or secondary to the Candidate’s main area of specialization, defense of a research proposal or completion of a project in an area outside the Candidate’s main area of specialization.(See footnote below.)
  4. Specialization with mastery at an advanced level of the body of knowledge pertaining to the Candidate’s chosen area of research, as demonstrated by the successful oral defense of a thesis proposal, and by completion of a program of study approved by the Graduate Program Committee. The extent and content of this program are designed to meet the individual interests and needs of the Candidate. (See footnote #12 below.)
  5. Professional competence in resource development for a research project or technology startup enterprise, as demonstrated by completion of a competitive research proposal or business plan for a technology startup company. The proposal or business plan may be developed either independently or as part of the Competitive Proposal Workshop.
    1. Original research making a significant contribution to knowledge, combined with demonstration of professional expertise in the chosen area of study, as demonstrated by at least the following:
        The oral examination, procedures for demonstrating technical breadth, thesis proposal, and work-shop to facilitate development of a competitive research proposal or business plan are described in more detail in the Thayer School Guide to Programs and Courses.
      1. presentation of elements of the doctoral research at a professional meeting with the Candidate as first author,
      2. a dissertation of professional quality certified by the Candidate’s thesis committee,
      3. acceptance of at least one manuscript on the doctoral research for publication with the Candidate as first author, and
      4. public oral presentation and defense of the dissertation.

    12 The oral examination, procedures for demonstrating technical breadth, thesis proposal, and work-shop to facilitate development of a competitive research proposal or business plan are described in more detail in the Thayer School Guide to Programs and Courses.

    Ph.D. Program in Innovation

     

    Thayer School offers a Ph.D. Program in Innovation, which supplements the student’s engineering research with specific coursework and practice in applying entrepreneurial skills to move research discoveries to market. Students in the Program in Innovation meet all requirements for admission to candidacy and full admission to the Ph.D. program, including passing an oral qualifying examination and defending a Ph.D. thesis proposal. Specific requirements for the candidates in the Program in Innovation can be found in the Thayer School Guide to Programs and Courses.

    M.D.-Ph.D. Program in Biomedical Engineering

     

    Thayer School of Engineering and the Dartmouth Medical School offer an M.D./Ph.D. program in biomedical engineering. Students must apply to the Medical School, indicating their interest in the joint program. The requirements for the Ph.D. portion of the program are modified to permit a more efficient completion of the dual degree program.

    A student may begin by first pursuing two years of study in basic science at the Medical School. Enrollment in Thayer School for two years follows, during which the student would take courses, qualify for Ph.D. candidacy, pass the oral examination, and initiate dissertation research. Alternately, some students prefer to satisfy basic Ph.D. requirements before starting medical school. The research would then be continued in concert with years 3 and 4 of the M.D. program (the clinical years), especially during year 4 where dissertation research would be counted as elective courses toward the M.D. Both degrees are awarded simultaneously after typically 6 to 6 1/2 years of study.

    Specific requirements of this program are:

    M.D. component: Completion of the 4-year M.D. curriculum. Elective time of year 4 can be devoted to Ph.D. dissertation research. (Consult the Dartmouth Medical School Catalog for details.)

    Ph.D. component:

    1. Students in the M.D./Ph.D. program are expected to spend at least six terms in residence, one which will take place after successfully completing the Oral Qualifying Examination. In addition, students are required to have:
      1. three terms of participation in the weekly Thayer Seminar on Applied Science and Technology, including one-time completion of the special graduate Seminar on Science, Technology and Society, ENGG 195, with students required to attend only five of the nine meetings in a the term, and
      2. annual participation in the Research-in-Progress Workshop, for which each Candidate in residence presents his or her individual research progress.
    2. Technical proficiency in principles and methods of engineering, applied science, and applied mathematics underlying the anticipated thesis research, as evidenced by performance on an oral qualifying examination. The examination covers at least three fundamental areas selected by the Candidate in consultation with his or her special advisory committee and approved by the graduate program committee.
    3. Technical breadth in engineering or applied science, as demonstrated by either an approved course of study in one or more areas outside or secondary to the Candidate’s main area of specialization or defense of a research proposal or completion of a project in an area outside the Candidate’s main area of specialization13.
    4. Specialization with mastery at an advanced level of the body of knowledge pertaining to the Candidate’s chosen area of research, as demonstrated by the successful oral defense of a thesis proposal, and by completion of a program of study approved by the M.D./Ph.D. Biomedical Engineering Committee. The extent and content of this program are designed to meet the individual interests and needs of the Candidate. (See footnote below.)
    5. Original research making a significant contribution to knowledge, combined with demonstration of professional expertise in the chosen area of study, as demonstrated by at least the following:
      1. presentation of elements of the doctoral research at a professional meeting with the Candidate as first author,
      2. a dissertation of professional quality certified by the Candidate’s thesis committee.
      3. acceptance of at least one manuscript on the doctoral research for publication with the Candidate as first author, and
      4. public oral presentation and defense of the dissertation.

    13 The oral examination, procedures for demonstrating technical breadth, thesis proposal, and work-shop to facilitate development of a competitive research proposal or business plan are described in more detail in the Thayer School Guide to Programs and Courses

    Ph.D. in Computer Science

     

    A Ph.D. in computer science is offered by the graduate program in Computer Science, including some Thayer School faculty. See Computer Science for details.

    Advanced Graduate Courses

     

    Courses at the 300 level are ‘advanced graduate’ courses, distinguished from 100 and 200-level courses by the standard of accomplishment that is required. These advanced graduate courses comprise an in-depth study of an area of engineering or engineering sciences up to the point where the student is able effectively to read and evaluate current literature in the field and to the point where the student should be ready to undertake original work in the field.

    Most 300-level courses are tutorials. The small size of Thayer School allows students to work closely with professors—a significant feature in courses that are expected to provide in-depth study.

    These courses reflect areas of significant faculty professional involvement or areas in which they are engaged in advanced research or development.

    Please consult the Thayer School Guide to Programs and Courses for the 300 level courses, Tutorial courses, Engineering Management courses and Project, Research, Independent Study, Seminar and Workshop courses.