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Organization, Regulations, and Courses 2016-17


Linguistics

Chair: D. A. Peterson; Acting Chair: L. Whaley

Professors B. Duncan (German), L. H. Glinert (AMELL), P. W. Travis (English), L. J. Whaley (Linguistics and Classics); Associate Professors C. K. Donahue (Linguistics), D. A. Garretson (Russian), D. A. Peterson (Linguistics), J. N. Stanford (Linguistics); Assistant Professor L. McPherson (Linguistics); Senior Lecturer T. J. Pulju (Linguistics); Visiting Professor: T. Ernst (Linguistics).

To view Linguistics courses, click here.

The Major in Linguistics

Prior to the Class of 2020

Students who pursue a major in linguistics should take ten courses beyond LING 1. Also, in addition to fulfilling the College foreign language requirement, linguistics majors should take two more foreign language courses. They may fulfill this requirement by taking two courses in a single language beyond the first-year level. Alternatively, one or both of these additional language courses may be in a different language not closely related to the first.

The ten courses for the major should include the following:

1.  LING 22

2.   LING 20 or LING 21

3.  At least three additional LING courses in the 20s or 30s (LING 20, LING 21, LING 23, LING 24, LING 25, LING 26, LING 27, LING 35)

4.   At least two more courses in Linguistics, including one that satisfies the requirement for a culminating activity, which may be met in one of three ways:

a. completing a senior Honors thesis (LING 86-87)

b. taking an advanced seminar in linguistics (LING 80)

c. carrying out a one or two term independent study project (LING 85)

5.  Up to three other courses, either from the Linguistics offerings or selected from the following list, in consultation with an adviser. ANTH 9; EDUC 58; FREN 35; PHIL 6, PHIL 34; RUSS 48. Certain courses not listed here, such as advanced seminars in various departments, may also be counted towards the major with permission of the Chair.

The modified major in linguistics combines linguistics with another discipline in a coherent program of study. It has as its prerequisites LING 1 and a solid competence in a foreign language.

The six courses for the linguistics portion of the major should include the following:

  1. At least three linguistics courses in the 20s (LING 20, LING 21, LING 22, LING 23, LING 24, LING 25, LING 26, LING 27)
  2. At least two other courses, chosen from the offerings in linguistics and/or the related courses approved for the regular major in linguistics
  3. A course which satisfies the requirement for a culminating activity, which may be met as for the regular major in linguistics

Students who wish to modify another major with linguistics should take LING 1 as a prerequisite. They should then take four other courses, distributed as follows: (a) two courses in the history or structure of natural languages (one of these will normally be LING 21, LING 22, LING 23, LING 24, LING 25, LING 26 or LING 27 and the other may be LING 18, FREN 35, RUSS 62, or SPAN 40); (b) one course in language and culture (ANTH 9, LING 17 or LING 40); and (c) one course in formal linguistics (LING 20, LING 21, LING 22, LING 23, LING 25 or LING 26, PHIL 34, or PSYC 51 [when offered as Psycholinguistics]).

Beginning with the Class of 2020

Students who pursue a major in linguistics should take ten courses beyond Linguistics 1. Linguistics majors should also take two foreign language courses in addition to the College's foreign language requirement. They may fulfill this requirement by taking two courses in a single language beyond the first-year level in the same language as used to fulfill the College requirement. Alternatively, one or both of these additional language courses may be in a different language not closely related to the first. Linguistics 8 and Linguistics 35 may be used to fulfill one or both of these additional language courses; if used in this way, however, Linguistics 8 and Linguistics 35 may not also be counted towards the major.

The ten courses for the major should be constituted as follows:

  1. Linguistics 22
  2. Linguistics 20 or 21
  3. One course in the 30s (Linguistics 33, 35)
  4. At least three additional courses in the 20s or 30s (Linguistics 20, 21, 23, 24, 26, 27, 33, 35)
  5. Four more courses in Linguistics, including one that satisfies the requirement for a culminating activity, which may be met in one of three ways:
    (a) Completing a senior Honors thesis (Linguistics 86-87)
    (b) Taking an advanced seminar in linguistics (Linguistics 80)
    (c) Carrying out a one or two term independent study project (Linguistics 85)
  6. Of the courses not used to satisfy the culminating activity requirement under 5, students may substitute up to two courses from the following, in consultation with an advisor: Anthropology 9, Education 58, French 35, Philosophy 6 and 34, Russian 48. Certain courses not listed here, such as advanced seminars in various departments, may also be counted towards the major with permission of the Chair.
  7. Majors may not include more than two courses designated as Linguistics 11.

The Minor in Linguistics

The minor in Linguistics has a prerequisite of Linguistics 1 and then five additional courses. Three or more of the five must be courses taught in the Linguistics Program, and at least two of these should be numbered in the 20s. The remaining courses are to be selected in conjunction with the student’s adviser.

Honors Program

The Honors Program in Linguistics offers qualified students the opportunity to undertake independent research under the direction of a faculty member. Students who plan to undertake such a project should have a 3.0 grade average in all courses taken at the College and an average of 3.3 for courses within the major. It is important to consult with a prospective adviser as early as possible, preferably during the junior year; applications to the Honors Program may be submitted to the Chair either during the spring of the junior year or the fall of the senior year. The project itself normally lasts two terms. Special majors in Linguistics take corresponding linguistics courses. The completed thesis is to be submitted during the spring term, and then an oral presentation is given at a special seminar of students and faculty.

 

See Linguistics courses